5 Tips for parents when December simply feels weary

By December 18, 2017Christmas
5 Tips for parents when December simply feels weary

5 Tips for parents when December simply feels weary

December can feel weary…

So much happens in December.

School assemblies, break ups, Christmas celebrations, awards, leavers dinners, carols by candlelight, endless shopping…

The list of responsibility seems endless.

It feels like you are running towards the finish line called Christmas Day except in the days leading up to Christmas Day the kids are off.

One minute they are their whimsical self and the next they are irritable, grumpy, scratchy and a right pain in the backside.  It can often feel as if you have become a human barricade trying to seperate siblings who are cranky with each other.

I remember wanting December to be this month of whimsical delight.

Where magic happened…and joy and peace were not long hoped for feelings but living realities.

  1. Factor in slow time.  

Kids are no different to adults.  We go on holidays and it takes us time to unwind, to slow,  to become human again.  We often don’t realise how tired we are until we stop.

Kids are just like us except they can’t articulate their fatigue and they can’t control it as well.

Don’t be afraid to let them watch movies on those first few days of holidays.  To have a pyjama day.  To slow and not go anywhere.  The sooner the kids slow the sooner they will become their delightful, whimsical selves.

2.  Work out which rules need to be relaxed and which ones need to be kept.

It’s not the end of the world if the kid won’t eat at the dinner table or put their toys away.  When we are on holidays we allow our internal rules to relax and adopt different sets of rules.  Its the same with kids…they need some of the rules relaxed.

But they also need some rules kept in place.  For example there are only a certain number of nights that kids can go out in a week.  There will be some things where we simply have to say, “It’s not our time to do that.”

3.  Eat slowly.

Eating good, healthy food slowly helps kids to slow, to relax.  Do some crazy things like a picnic at the Gorge or at Trevallyn Dam, have a picnic on the floor with only fairy lights on, light a BBQ and cook slow.

4.  Touch and cuddle.

Touch relaxes, cuddles help children to reconnect.  I had one child who spent the first 5 days of holidays just wanting to be cuddled.  Touch slows.

5.  Commit to teaching your kids how to slow.

Learning how to slow is important.  It is a skill.

As adults we often struggle to slow when we start holidays.  We struggle to make the transition from busy to slow.

Our kids have been working and working hard.  They too will struggle to make the transition to slow.  It will take them a week to unwind just like it takes you and me a good week to unwind when we commence holidays.

 

 

 

Kids aren’t bad… December has simply wearied them.

They need us to help them slow…